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New VA Education Policy Allows Veterans To Get Multiple Degrees

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If you’re a veteran looking to go to school, we have some good news! The Department of Veterans Affairs made some major changes to education benefits this month. The VA is now allowing veterans to apply their benefits toward multiple degrees with the new VA Education Policy.

“Effective April 1, 2021, VA will not count veteran entitlement used in the Veteran Readiness and Employment (VR&E) program against the 48-month rule for education programs like the Post-9/11 GI Bill,”

a VA spokesperson said in a statement.

What the VA Has Changed

VR&E, otherwise known as Chapter 31, gives veterans who have a service-connected disability and at least a 10% rating, access to various resources to help them find employment.

According to the VA, now any employers hiring veterans eligible for the benefit can receive a federal tax credit or be reimbursed for up to half of their salary.

Previously VR&E could not be used together with the Post-9/11 GI Bill, which covers four years of college for veterans. Those who used the full 48 months of benefits included with VR&E would also be ineligible for the GI Bill — Making this the most significant change to education benefits since the “Forever GI Bill.”

What This VA Education Policy Means 

Although the cause of the amendment to the VA education policy is unclear. Many veterans are undoubtedly happy about their decision. 

So what does this mean for you?

Since the VA doesn’t count VR&E against other GI Bill benefits; this means essentially, you could earn a CDL license, accounting certificate, or traditional college degree. Then go back to school with the Post-9/11 GI Bill to earn another degree. 

Want to learn more? An FAQ VA sent out to students on the changes to benefits can be found here.

Get The Benefits You Deserve

contact one of our consultants today for a free evaluation of your VA claim

learn more
James Cooper
James Cooper
James Cooper comes from a long line of Veterans and decided to enlist for the Marine Corps at the ripe age of 18-years-old following in his father's footsteps. Shortly after being medically discharged from the service, James decided to pursue a career in journalism. Having battled with the VA for years himself, he began to study the system and commit his career to help fellow disabled veterans.

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New VA Education Policy Allows Veterans To Get Multiple Degrees

If you’re a veteran looking to go to school, we have some good news! The Department of Veterans Affairs made some major changes to education benefits this month. The VA is now allowing veterans to apply their benefits toward multiple degrees with the new VA Education Policy.

“Effective April 1, 2021, VA will not count veteran entitlement used in the Veteran Readiness and Employment (VR&E) program against the 48-month rule for education programs like the Post-9/11 GI Bill,”

a VA spokesperson said in a statement.

What the VA Has Changed

VR&E, otherwise known as Chapter 31, gives veterans who have a service-connected disability and at least a 10% rating, access to various resources to help them find employment.

According to the VA, now any employers hiring veterans eligible for the benefit can receive a federal tax credit or be reimbursed for up to half of their salary.

Previously VR&E could not be used together with the Post-9/11 GI Bill, which covers four years of college for veterans. Those who used the full 48 months of benefits included with VR&E would also be ineligible for the GI Bill — Making this the most significant change to education benefits since the “Forever GI Bill.”

What This VA Education Policy Means 

Although the cause of the amendment to the VA education policy is unclear. Many veterans are undoubtedly happy about their decision. 

So what does this mean for you?

Since the VA doesn’t count VR&E against other GI Bill benefits; this means essentially, you could earn a CDL license, accounting certificate, or traditional college degree. Then go back to school with the Post-9/11 GI Bill to earn another degree. 

Want to learn more? An FAQ VA sent out to students on the changes to benefits can be found here.

Get The Benefits You Deserve

contact one of our consultants today for a free evaluation of your VA claim

learn more
James Cooper
James Cooper
James Cooper comes from a long line of Veterans and decided to enlist for the Marine Corps at the ripe age of 18-years-old following in his father's footsteps. Shortly after being medically discharged from the service, James decided to pursue a career in journalism. Having battled with the VA for years himself, he began to study the system and commit his career to help fellow disabled veterans.

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Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

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